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    Thread: Aphonopelma seemanni Moulting Issues

    1. #1
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      Aphonopelma seemanni Moulting Issues

      Recently, I purchased a juvenile (2.5") female that I have had my eye on for months. Unfortunately, after moving her to a larger enclosure and watching her for a few days, I noticed that she was having difficulty using two of her back legs on the left side. Apparently, she had been acting strangely since her last moult. The dealer guaranteed her, no questions asked, but I don't want to give her back.
      Holly moulted this past weekend - luckily for me that it was when I was home. Not only was I concerned about the two damaged back legs getting stuck, but she also started moulting upright. I know there is controversy surrounding whether to flip them over or not, but Holly was clearly in distress and, after watching and waiting for a long time, I gently turned her over. After that, things proceeded much faster, but she did end up getting one of the damaged back legs stuck. It was hugely challenging, for both of us, but she made it through. She is missing the metatarsus and tarsus from the back leg, which I'm happy about because they won't cause problems with her next moult.
      My concern is that she seems fine, but she is moving strangely since her moult. It seems as if she is not lifting herself off the substrate properly and seems to be scooting along on her belly. It has only been a few days, and I am hoping that this resolves itself as she hardens, but I'm concerned that this is a sign of something more serious and she is never going to fully recover.
      She is in a shoebox type enclosure, eco-earth coco sub which is slightly damp on one side and dry on the other, large water dish with fresh water only which I overflow a bit.
      Have other people had similar experiences?

      My first upright moult
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      After gently rolling her over
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      You can see the one leg is stuck - I had to help her out a bit
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      You can see the metatarsus and tarsus is missing from the rear leg pointing in the air
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      This is taken the next day
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      Last edited by ArachnoVegan; 03-08-2017 at 03:34 PM. Reason: spelling mistake

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      I'm sure that was a very stressful experience to go through for you and your T. I have never had a T molt upright like that but it doesn't look like you did any harm by flipping her. I would give her a few more days to recover from a bad molt before I worried too much about her movements. She may be super weak. I've had adult T's just lay flat on their stomach with legs outstretched for a week after a molt. And that was after a normal molt. Just keep us updated on her progress. Others will probably chime in with more advice. She is beautiful BTW.
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      I have a female P. regalis that only ate 3 times for two molting periods...and is thriving today with no adverse affects! I surely thought she was not going to make it. I hope Holly pulls through as she has a very caring care giver
      T. stirmi 0.3.18, T. apophysis 6.5" 0.1.0
      N. chromatus 0.1.0, N. coloratovillosus 0.2.0
      G. pulchripes 0.1.0, A. geniculata 0.2.0
      P. regalis 0.2.0, Chilobrachy sai yok 0.1.0, Gorgyrella sp. black Africa 0.1.0
      L. parahybana 0.1.0, L. striatipes 0.2.0, L. klugi 0.1.0, Pamphobeteus sp. Santo Domingo 0.1.0
      Acanthogonatus pi ss ii 0.2.0, Acanthogonatus francki 0.2.0, 1-Linothele fallax 0.1.0, A. vilches 0.1.0, Diplura sp. Sanguinea 1/2"

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