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    Thread: How Kingworms get so big. DON'T FEED THESE TO Ts!!

    1. #1
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      How Kingworms get so big. DON'T FEED THESE TO Ts!!

      So I have a very thriving mealworm colony, and am still trying to get my kingworms going.

      Two things. Once they always seem so lethargic and half-dead. Are they just less active than regular mealworms?

      Second, I can never get the next generation to grow up to the same size as their parents. In just one or two generations, they always wind up being about the same size as regular mealworms.

      So how do I get them to grow up full size and keep reproducing that way?

      I feed them oats and wheat germ, and potatoes for moisture.

      Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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      Originally Posted by ManlyMan7

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      Originally Posted by crawltech
      Toss the male in, take him out of the water dish in bolus form the next day.

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    2. #2
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      OK, as I did a bit of research online, I have found a suggestion that kingworms (giant mealworms, NOT superworms) are in fact regular mealworms that have been fed juvenile hormones to delay their pupating and extend their growth.

      As such, the second generation will revert back to regular-sized mealworms. Some even suggest they are thus sterile. This is consistent with my experience, and actually, I was beginning to suspect something like this might be at play. Why are they so sluggish and half-dead compaired to my mealies? Why don't I EVER get full-sized kingworms on the second generation? Why do I have such problems getting a colony going? This makes a lot of sense.

      One implication that was stated explicitly about kingworms is that they are intended for fish bate, and NOT to be fed to our pets (herps or inverts).





      Any one out there able to confirm or deny this? Anyone have success with a kingworm colony?
      Last edited by ManlyMan7; 03-12-2013 at 12:57 AM.

    3. #3
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      Quote Originally Posted by ManlyMan7 View Post
      OK, as I did a bit of research online, I have found a suggestion that kingworms (giant mealworms, NOT superworms) are in fact regular mealworms that have been fed juvenile hormones to delay their pupating and extend their growth.
      I have never even heard of kingworms before today, but I'm repulsed at the idea that someone is fiddling with hormones like this. All the same, it wouldn't surprise me if that was the truth. Sorry I can't be of any help, but if there are others like myself who have never heard of them, that might tell you something, as well...

      I'm curious to hear what you find out...

    4. #4
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      Quote Originally Posted by lagomorphette View Post
      I have never even heard of kingworms before today, but I'm repulsed at the idea that someone is fiddling with hormones like this. All the same, it wouldn't surprise me if that was the truth. Sorry I can't be of any help, but if there are others like myself who have never heard of them, that might tell you something, as well...

      I'm curious to hear what you find out...
      OK, so I just called a Canadian cricket supplier just a few hours from me who supplies great feeders. I had emailed him to ask him and his response confirmed what I had heard. Kingworms (Giant Mealworms) are fed juvenile hormones that keep them from maturing/pupating so they continue to grow. What is used here is stuff that is often used as pesticides to prevent pests from maturing, thus killing off their life-cycle!




      He did second what I had heard that kingworms are NOT good to feed to inverts, but he did say he didn't have a problem feeding them to herps.

      I thanked him for his transparency. We are becoming on a first-name basis, and I appreciated his up-frontness with me.

      So there you have it.

      And I am done trying to get my kingworm colony off the ground.

      Glad my mealies are MULTIPLYING at the moment!

      BTW, I should put this tidbit into the breeding mealie thread, but I have found two keys to my mealie colony thriving. 1. Keep them hydrated with potatoes (I use sub-golfball-sized potatoes I buy in a bag at the grocery store), and 2. separate the pupae from the rest of the colony (then pulling the mature beetles back out of the rest of the pupae and back into the colony). This prevents the pupae from getting munched on by the beetles.

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      Originally Posted by ManlyMan7

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      Originally Posted by crawltech
      Toss the male in, take him out of the water dish in bolus form the next day.

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    5. #5
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      i have been wanting to get a colony of meal worms started but not got to it as of yet: (

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